Post Stitch Pixie Bonnet

I think every yarn twisting mama (or papa) has a few tricks in their repertoire that they favor over others. For me, one of my favorite crochet techniques is the post stitch.

While this stitch may be a little tricky when you first learn it because you have to modify your hold on the fabric, the results are fantastic, especially if you’re designing something you want to be stretchy (like my big booty Boho Poncho). If you’ve ever crocheted a sweater you might have noticed that stretchiness is not the strongest suit of crochet, in fact, in a lot of instances simple non-lacey crochet fabric can be a little rigid.

Alternating front and back post stitches, however, creates a moderately stretchy fabric with the added bonus of an interesting, ribbed texture. Working it in bulky yarns enhances these characteristics for a big, cushy, warm garment. Here’s a little free niblet of a pattern I worked up recently to hone down my stash – a simple but fun pointed bonnet in both child and adult size!

PixieBonnet2

Hook: 5.00 mm

Yarn: Bulky Weight (I used 2 skeins Patons Saturate 50 g / 95 yds for Child Size, 2 skeins Lion Brand Wool-Ease Chunky 140 g / 153 yds for Adult Size)

Gauge: 7 sts = 2″ in alternating front post / back post double crochet

Stitches used: Chain (ch), double crochet (dc), front post double crochet (FPDC ), back post double crochet (BPDC), slip stitch (sl st). Here’s a little tutorial on post stitching from Craftsy.

Child Size: (7.5″ at the back seam, 8″ across the top)

PixieBonnet3

Ch 56.

Row 1: Dc in the 3rd ch from the hk and in ea of the next 53 sts.

Row 2: Ch 2, turn. (FPDC in the next st, BPDC in the next st) 26 times. FPDC in the next st. Dc in the last stitch (the 2nd chain of the previous row’s turning chain)

Row 3: Ch 2, turn. (BPDC in the next st, FPDC in the next st) 26 times. BPDC in the next st. Dc in the last st (the 2nd ch of the previous row’s turning chain)

Rows 4-15: Repeat rows 2 & 3 six times.

Row 16: Rpt row 2.

Turn and fold the square of crocheted fabric in half. Slip stitch through both layers at once to make the seam (the seam is now the back of the bonnet). Slip stitch all the way to the corner of the fold, then cut yarn and tie off.

Reattach yarn at one of the open corners opposite the seam. Chain 30, then slip stitch back down the chain to form a cord, cut yarn and tie off.

If you want to add a curlicue to the bottom of the bonnet ties (as pictured on the adult bonnet), chain an extra 12 stitches and then work 3 dc into each of the next 10 chain stitches, starting with the 3rd ch from the hook. Then continue to slip stitch back down the chain.

Repeat at the opposite corner. Weave in all ends!

Adult Size: (9.5″ at the back seam, 10″ across the top)

PixieBonnet1

Ch 76.

Row 1: Dc in the 3rd ch from the hook and in ea of the next 73 sts.

Row 2: Ch 2, turn. (FPDC in the next st, BPDC in the next st) 36 times. FPDC in the next st. Dc in the last stitch (the 2nd ch of the previous row’s turning chain).

Row 3: Ch 2, turn. (BPDC in the next st, FPDC in the next st) 36 times. BPDC in the next st. Dc in the last st (the 2nd ch of the previous row’s turning chain).

Rows 4 – 19: Repeat rows 2 & 3 eight times.

Row 20: Rpt row 2.

Turn and fold the square of crocheted fabric in half. Slip stitch through both layers at once to make the seam (the seam is now the back of the bonnet). Slip stitch all the way to the corner of the fold, then cut yarn and tie off.

Reattach yarn at one of the open corners. Chain 40, then slip stitch back down the chain to form a cord. 

If you want to add a curlicue to the bottom of the bonnet ties (as pictured on the adult bonnet), chain an extra 12 stitches and then work 3 dc into each of the next 10 chain stitches, starting with the 3rd ch from the hook. Then continue to slip stitch back down the chain.

Repeat at the opposite corner. Weave in all ends!

I had thought by now it would be a bit too warm for this pattern, being (supposedly) late spring in the northern hemisphere, but a long stormy/chilly spell here in the midwest has encouraged me to hunker down with the cozy yarns for a little longer!

-MF

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s