Flidais Hooded Cowl

FlidaisCollage

I’ve had this lovely thrifted sweater hanging in my closet for about a year now, waiting patiently for the sweater hacking that I knew was to come.

SweaterHack1

Sorry about this photo. Inspiration doesn’t always strike when there is convenient lighting.

It was missing a couple buttons and the sleeves were ridiculously long in addition to the main body being short and boxy. It was sort of cute in  a 90’s way, but the components were what I bought it for. The faux fur on the collar was in pristine condition and the yarn was a soft wool blend, plus the buttons that remained had a rustic wood-looking finish. It could be something really fun, but it needed to be deconstructed first.

Flidaispile

So I took it apart, using the sweater yarn reclamation method I wrote about extensively in my post series Everything You Need to Know to Start Recycling Sweater Yarn. The faux fur collar was finished on the back, so I very carefully freed the knit backing to keep the original finish. I would come back to that later.

After some pulling, I obtained enough yarn to make the bulky-weight yarn version of my Rhiannon Hooded Cowl pattern. I planned to use the faux fur collar as a bold hood trim, after I fixed the loose finish by stringing the knit stitches onto a needle and casting them off with a spare tail of yarn – score another for being bistitchual!

Flidais1.1

It worked, and I had the perfect chunky yarn to finish it off with the drawstring detail, but the hood trim was a touch floppy. I could have just secured it with a few whip stitches, but if there is one thing I always end up striving for in my designs, it’s versatility. I love choices! Even though the Rhiannon Cowl is designed to be worn several different ways, I felt like I could put in one more “look” option with what I was now calling the “Flidais” Cowl. And I already had these conveniently matching buttons, which just happened to fit inside the eyelets of the stitch pattern.

So I sewed the buttons onto the back of the faux fur trim, enabling them to be secured with the fur either outward, as a trim, or inward – deepening the pixie style hood and providing a warm lining in the front.

Flidais2.2

And then I ran out to the woods to play dress-up. Of course.

I have a penchant for mythology (obv): “Flidais” is the name of a Celtic woodland goddess, and was the original working title of the “Rhiannon” cowl, until I decided that Rhiannon better fit the silvery look of the pattern model cowl I made. So I was delighted that I had come up with an interpretation of that design that I could call Flidais (pronounced “flee-ish” in Gaelic) after the mythical goddess of hunting and herding.

Both the Flidais Convertible Cowl and the pattern for the Rhiannon Hooded Cowl are available in my Etsy shop!

The Rhiannon Hooded Cowl pattern was recently featured on Moogly and P2P’s linkup – as the most clicked project for the round! Thank you everyone for the clicks and the love, and thank you to the hardworking linkup hostesses!

Hookin on Hump Day

I’ve got plenty more patterns in the works – follow my Facebook page for the newest updates!

-MF

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